If Carlsberg did Data Governance

In this part of the world, we’re treated to wonderful TV ads from Carlsberg, with the theme “If Carlsberg did…, it would probably be the best…. in the world”. One of my favourites is “If Carlsberg did Haircuts”.

This led me to think, what if Carlsberg did Data Governance?
Picture the scene…  Your CEO is looking for a new report, and she has tasked you with providing it, by close of business tomorrow! Where do you start?

In steps the “Data Waiter”, who presents you with a complete menu of the data in your organisation, suggests the data required for the new report and then prompts you with friendly questions like:

  • How would you like your data sliced?
    Would you like it by Geography, or Business line? Perhaps by Product, or by Customer Type?
  • What time period would you like your data to cover?
    For a light snack, I can recommend a “Point in Time” snapshot? Or perhaps you would like to include the past month? I can recommend the house special, which is a “Trend over time” for the past year.
  • How up to date would you like your data to be?
    The early-bird menu has some lovely data we captured 2 years ago. For a $10 supplement you can have data from 1 year ago. On the a la carte menu, you can choose from a wide range, from 6 months old to near-real-time.
  • How often would you like your data?
    Would you prefer a once-off or perhaps a weekly / monthly data extract? We do a lovely daily extract, or perhaps you would like real-time data-streaming?
  • What level of trust does your CEO need in the report you’re preparing?
    The early-bird menu has a fresh slice of big data. It’s a beautiful visualisation that looks really pretty – your CEO will love it. I’ve been assured that the data was so big that there’s no need to worry about the quality of it. (Editor note: Beware of Big Data Bullshit – Look up “Veracity” which is the critical, but often overlooked, 4th “V” of Big Data).
    If your CEO needs a higher level of trust in your report, we have a complete selection of data that we’ve traced from data entry to our own reporting data warehouse, complete with data quality metrics along the data supply chain.

Having selected the data you need, the data waiter scans your retina, confirms you have appropriate access authority, and then delivers the data to your preferred location. You prepare your report and your CEO is so delighted that she promotes you to the senior management team… Happy days! Scene ends.

What services would you like from “The best Data Governance in the world”?

For more about “Trust in data” see my blog post “The growing demand for food and data provenance“.

This article originally appeared on LinkedIn Pulse

Gravitational Collapse in the PIM Space

All organisations have critical business processes. In today’s data driven world, business success depends on the quality of data that underpins your critical business processes, and flows between them.

On 12th Feb 2016, the UK Prudential Regulatory Authority (PRA) published a “Data Review” of how 50 firms in the Insurance Industry assess the quality of data that underpins the validity and integrity of one of their most important business processes, their Solvency II Internal Model”.

Regardless of the industry you are in, I recommend that you read the review. It contains examples of good practice, but also many “war stories” showing where firms got it wrong. One recurring theme is the failure of firms to realise the dependency between upstream and downstream business processes, and the data flow between them.

On 21st Feb 2016, I read an excellent post by Henrik Lilliendahl that I have re-blogged here. Henrik’s post deals with Product Information Management (PIM) and is completely independent of the Insurance Industry or Solvency II. Yet Henrik has summarised brilliantly the relationship between upstream and downstream business processes (business partners), and the need for a “Data Broker Service” between them.

The previous post on this blog was called Gravitational Waves in the MDM World. Building further on space science, I would like to use the concept of gravitational collapse, which is the process that happens when a star or other space object is born. In this process, a myriad of smaller objects are gathered into a more dense object.

PIM (Product Information Management) is part of the larger MDM (Master Data Management) world. PIM solutions offered today serves very well the requirements for organizing and supporting the handling of product information inside each organization.

However, there is an instability when observing two trading partners. Today, the most common mean to share product data is to exchange one or several spreadsheets with product identification and product attributes (sometimes also called properties or features). Such spreadsheets may also contain links to digital assets being product images, line drawing documents, installation…

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