How to deal with Gobbledygook requirements

In my last post I had a bit of a rant about the Gobbledygook “eligibility requirements” provided by the UK Financial Services Compensation Scheme.

The reality is that business requirements can come from many places, they are often vague, and often overly complex.  They are often imposed on you from outside, as in the case of regulatory requirements, like the UK regulatory requirement to deliver a Single Customer View.

So… life can be tough – you have to get on with it, and deal with “less than perfect” requirements.

Well defined requirements are clear, measurable and testable.  You cannot expect business experts to be expert in defining requirements. As a Data Quality professional, one of your roles is to work with business experts to clarify and simplify their requirements.

Let us look at the “eligibility requirements” provided by the UK Financial Services Compensation Scheme

In essence, some customer types are eligible for compensation, while others are not.  You must use your “parsing skills” to parse the overly complex rules – to “sort the apples from the oranges” so to speak.   Start by listing unique customer types, which include:

  • Sole Trader
  • Credit Union
  • Collective Investment Scheme
  • Trustee of a Collective Investment Scheme
  • Operator of a Collective Investment Scheme

Having done that, you can begin the task of finding out whether you can currently identify these customer types within your data.

The above is just a starting point, I hope it helps.

Feedback welcome, as always.

Eligibility Business Rule – Gobbledygook!

About this time last year, I started a discussion about business rules.

Recent experience has prompted me to re-open the discussion, as UK deposit takers seek to address a regulatory compliance requirement, namely to deliver a Single Customer View.

In the UK,  if a bank fails (goes bust), eligible deposit holders are guaranteed their money back, up to a limit of £50,000.   The term “eligible” is critical.  The UK Financial Services Compensation Scheme (UK FSCS) requires UK deposit takers to build a Single Customer View (SCV), that  identifies “eligible” deposit holders, and calculates their compensation entitlement.

UK FSCS Single Customer View Eligibility Rules - Top

Deposit Takers must “flag eligible accounts”, and provide “An explanation of any code or keys used internally by the deposit taker, so that the FSCS can easily identify which accounts are held by eligible claimants”.

The above sounds reasonable… So…. What is  the UK FSCS business rule for determining “eligibility”?

In layman’s terms, personal customers (individuals) and small businesses are eligible for compensation.
I hope you’re still with me – because it gets crazy from here, as we attempt to find out the exact rules for eligibility.

I include a screenshot of just some of the rules as they were on Sep 6th 2010 (click to enlarge and read).  Alternatively you may view the rules as they are today at: http://fsahandbook.info/FSA/html/handbook/COMP/4/2

I’ve worked in Data Management for almost 30 years, and I have seldom seen such gobbledygook.  Hundreds of deposit taking firms are subject to this regulation, which they must implement by January 2011. Each one must wade through this gobbledygook, seeking to extract clear, measurable and testable business rules, capable of being implemented. This is an example of bureaucracy gone mad.

What  you think?